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This experience was really cool because all the people looked almost like the real people. I learned a lot. What I liked about this event was that it felt like I was in that time frame. My favorite person there was Ben Franklin because I know a lot more things that he has done besides the Revolutionary War.

Jordan



Dear Hoover Museum,

Thank you for letting me come to your museum. I enjoyed looking at Herbert’s actual house because it was just fascinating. I also enjoyed the gift shop – there were some funny T-shirts. Last, but not least, I enjoyed the tour because I learned that Herbert Hoover was a great leader. Most of all I learned he really is a helpful, caring and loving person.

Sincerely,

Megan



Presidential-Troupe-at-Summit-School_web

Our thanks to the Revolutionary America troupe for their visit on March 8.  What an insightful and meaningful way for students to learn American history!



Where-in-the-world_web

Girls Scouts are tossing an inflated globe and the recipient must point to a country and guess if Lou and Bert lived there.

76 Girl Scouts and leaders spent Saturday afternoon at the Hoover Presidential Library celebrating  Lou Henry Hoover at the First Lady Day workshop. The Hoover Museum is a perfect destination for a Girl Scout field trip any time of the year. The Lou Henry Hoover gallery gives girls an opportunity to learn more about this important Scout leader. First Lady Lou Henry Hoover was an early leader of the Girl Scouts and served two terms as GSA president. “I was a Scout years ago, before the movement ever started,” Lou said late in life, recounting a childhood spent fishing and camping.

Scouts who visit the museum can fulfill 5 of the 6 requirements for the Lou Henry Hoover Patch through a specially designed tour.

FYI: Next year is the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts!



John-Adams-Talks_web

John Adams is talking about April of 1774 when the 1st Continental Congress was held. Its purpose was to unite the colonies and to get ready for war should there be war. The colonists were to start collecting weapons and gunpowder. A message was sent to the King demanding changes.

John Adams is talking again! This time explaining that a committee of 5 was formed to write the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson did most of the writing with some help from Benjamin Franklin and John Adams. The Declaration was approved on July 2, 1776, and adopted on July 4, 1776.

John Adams continued talking by explaining that Congress set to work on forming rules for a central government. This set of rules was called the Articles of Confederation.



John-Adams-Talks_web

John Adams is talking about April of 1774 when the 1st Continental Congress was held. Its purpose was to unite the colonies and to get ready for war should there be war. The colonists were to start collecting weapons and gunpowder. A message was sent to the King demanding changes.

John Adams is talking again! This time explaining that a committee of 5 was formed to write the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson did most of the writing with some help from Benjamin Franklin and John Adams. The Declaration was approved on July 2, 1776, and adopted on July 4, 1776.

John Adams continued talking by explaining that Congress set to work on forming rules for a central government. This set of rules was called the Articles of Confederation.

Morning Sun 5th Graders

by on March 30, 2011


5th-graders-at-Morning-Sun_web

“Thank you so much for coming—It was an excellent learning and concept reinforcement session for the 5th graders.”
Sometimes when the Presidential Troupe presents at a school it is after the students have finished studying the American Revolution, and we are there to reinforce what they have studied. Times like that are fun. The Morning Sun Elementary students were on fire! They knew their facts and were actively engaged and asked questions that showed they were widely read on the subject. The room was full of trade books and,  lucky for us,  Samuel Adams had read them all. So…when asked about why he didn’t ride a horse we were prepared!! Both Samuel and John Adams jumped to their feet giving their interpretations of the trip to the 1st Continental Congress.
Historical Anecdote: John Adams wrote a letter to relatives about the difficulties his cousin Samuel had while riding a horse to Philadelphia. Samuel’s preferred method of riding in a carriage would take too long. So Samuel was hoisted onto a horse, with considerable effort, and,  with help from a tailor in Connecticut (sewing padding into the back of his breeches),  he and John arrived in time for the 1st Continental Congress.


Ben-Franklin-talks-while-Samuel-Adams-listens_web

The Presidential Troupe traveled to North Bend Elementary in North Liberty to present Time Travel to Revolutionary America to 5th graders on Tuesday. The building was built three years ago and is state-of-the-art in every way:  white boards, computers everywhere,  commons areas for students to work together, etc.

That’s Ben Franklin talking about the constitution while Samuel Adams watches. One of Samuel’s quiet moments that doesn’t happen very frequently. He’s usually riling up the crowd.

Loyalist-talks_web

Phyllis portrays a Loyalist, not a specific person, but nonetheless a person loyal to the King of England. We think it adds to the presentation that students hear both sides of the story.

Loyalist: Good morrow young ladies and gentlemen. I’m going to tell you a secret – I am a Loyalist, but don’t tell these fine people. If they thought I was a Loyalist they would call me a traitor, or turn coat, or any of those names they use to describe those of us who support our Mother Country and the Royal family.

Why in the early part of the 1700s life in these colonies was wonderful, peaceful, a pleasant place for all. Great Britain was far away and paid little attention to what was going on here. Our own assembly men ran the townships and villages. The King seldom used his authority and when George III took the throne we all acclaimed undying loyalty to him, but then came the French and Indian Wars. They lasted 7 years and Britain had to send troops and more troops to protect our citizens. Of course the British Army included some colonists, in fact young Colonel George Washington was involved. The regulars had to be sent from Britain and all this left King George in debt. He had to call on the colonists to help. So he began to levy taxes on us. And why not, after all we should pay our share for our own protection!



Ben-Franklin-talks-while-Samuel-Adams-listens_web

The Presidential Troupe traveled to North Bend Elementary in North Liberty to present Time Travel to Revolutionary America to 5th graders on Tuesday. The building was built three years ago and is state-of-the-art in every way:  white boards, computers everywhere,  commons areas for students to work together, etc.

That’s Ben Franklin talking about the constitution while Samuel Adams watches. One of Samuel’s quiet moments that doesn’t happen very frequently. He’s usually riling up the crowd.

Loyalist-talks_web

Phyllis portrays a Loyalist, not a specific person, but nonetheless a person loyal to the King of England. We think it adds to the presentation that students hear both sides of the story.

Loyalist: Good morrow young ladies and gentlemen. I’m going to tell you a secret – I am a Loyalist, but don’t tell these fine people. If they thought I was a Loyalist they would call me a traitor, or turn coat, or any of those names they use to describe those of us who support our Mother Country and the Royal family.

Why in the early part of the 1700s life in these colonies was wonderful, peaceful, a pleasant place for all. Great Britain was far away and paid little attention to what was going on here. Our own assembly men ran the townships and villages. The King seldom used his authority and when George III took the throne we all acclaimed undying loyalty to him, but then came the French and Indian Wars. They lasted 7 years and Britain had to send troops and more troops to protect our citizens. Of course the British Army included some colonists, in fact young Colonel George Washington was involved. The regulars had to be sent from Britain and all this left King George in debt. He had to call on the colonists to help. So he began to levy taxes on us. And why not, after all we should pay our share for our own protection!



History-comes-alive_web

These 5th graders are enjoying interacting with the Presidential Troupe on St. Patrick’s Day. Are they smiling because Ben Franklin is talking about his days in France? Or…are they listening to John Adams as he defends the British soldiers at trial? Or…are they watching the Loyalist as she recalls the Boston Massacre?  Or…

Taxation-without-representation_web

You GUESSED it!

It’s Samuel Adams as he riles up the crowd talking about the Stamp Act. “Would you like that? Having to pay a half-penny on every sheet of paper you use.”

History Anecdote: The Sons of Liberty were started in Massachusetts by a loud-mouthed firebrand named Samuel Adams. They grew from a group called the Committees of Correspondence in the early months of 1765 and met in secret in the colonies’ bigger towns, often late at night.

At the age of 43, Sam Adams had failed at just about everything he had tried. He had studied law, lost a fortune in business, and even failed as a tax collector. But all those failures were forgotten when he turned to politics, because Samuel Adams was a spellbinding speaker. He could whip a crowd into a frenzy!

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