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Today you will find the NHPRC grant programs for FY2015 posted on our website with links to the grant application forms that appear on Grants.gov. The link to our grant announcements page is located at the following URL: http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/

The NHPRC programs are as follows:

Access to Historical Records

State Board Programming Grants

Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records

State Government Electronic Records

Digital Dissemination of Archival Collections

Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions

The many comments we received over the past several weeks assisted the Commission in developing these programs, so thanks again to all of those blog followers who shared their thoughts.

The staff will be scheduling a series of webinars for each grant program in the near future, so please watch this blog, the professional listservs and the NHPRC website and facebook page for the webinar schedule as we get it developed. And in the meantime, if you have questions, PLEASE contact the grant officer listed for the program(s) you are interested in. S/he will be very happy to answer your questions and, in addition, your questions will help us develop effective FAQs and webinar content.



A heartfelt thank you to those who commented on the draft NHPRC grant programs over the past several weeks. We received close to 75 comments via this blog, emails, listservs, and letters, and the Commission members have seen all of them. The thoughtfulness and passion found in many of your comments ensures that the Commission can have a robust discussion and thorough consideration of the matters before it. In terms of process, the Commission will hold a working meeting in April via teleconference and its regular biannual meeting on Tuesday, May 13 at the National Archives in Washington, DC. So stay tuned as the 2015 grant programs are finalized in the coming weeks.

Be assured that we truly value the work of ALL NHPRC grantees whether based at the nation’s archives, historical documentary editing projects, or in the states. The projects we fund broaden and deepen public access to America’s records – both intellectual and physical access. We are constantly looking for ways to take advantage of the tools and technologies available that will facilitate the discovery and use of historical records and ensure a deeper understanding of our national heritage, and I am grateful that so many of you registered your commitment to these efforts through your comments



Given the extensive changes being proposed and in response to requests, the NHPRC has extended the comment period on the proposed DRAFT grant guidelines in all six categories.

The new deadline to submit comments is Monday, March 31, 2014.  We ask that you share your thoughts by posting them on the NHPRC blog.  As always, we welcome comments from individuals and organizations who are interested in these NHPRC programs. The NHPRC staff will share your comments with the Commission members as they consider program changes in the coming weeks.



Given the extensive changes being proposed and in response to requests from the historical and documentary editing communities, the NHPRC has extended the comment period for the Online Publishing of Historical Records and Publishing Historical Records Online: Transition Support grant program drafts.

The new deadline to submit comments is Monday, March 31, 2014.  We ask that you share your thoughts by posting them on the NHPRC blog.  As always, we welcome comments from individuals and organizations who are interested in these NHPRC programs. The NHPRC staff will share your comments with the Commission members as they consider program changes in the coming weeks.

Webinar Schedule

by on February 18, 2014


webinar

We are offering a series of Webinars for people to discuss the proposed drafts for the NHPRC’s grant programs. You can find information about how to participate under the individual posts for each of the drafts:

February 20 — Publishing Historical Records: Transition Support

To listen to a digital recording of this call, dial the USA Toll-free telephone number 877-471-6587 or USA Caller Paid telephone number 1-402-970-2667 and enter program ID 215031941001.

February 21 — State Board Programming Grants

To listen to a digital recording of this webinar, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=3D1F07CE-4FE8-438F-88B7-9E72302C378F

February 24 — Literacy & Engagement with Historical Records

To listen to a digital recording of this webinar, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=CEC503A6-EE8F-462C-96AB-3D3CA65F9E37

February 24 — Access to Historical Records

February 25 — Online Publishing of Historical Records

To listen to a digital recording of this webinar, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=89DBFB3E-458E-491F-A85A-EDDE3C63CCC4

February 25 — State Government Electronic Records

To listen to a digital recording of this webinar, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=BC10F41D-CA17-4DE2-B1A7-70C78C97B9CC



These questions are intended to give you an overview of the proposed changes to NHPRC grants programs.  We want to hear from you by March 31, 2014, and the Commission must approve them before they are final.

Frequently Asked Questions

What changes are being considered for the NHPRC grants program?
The National Historical Publications and Records Commission has developed draft grant announcements in six categories:

  •  Access to Historical Records – projects to support preserving and processing primary source materials.
  • Literacy & Engagement with Historical Records — projects to explore ways to improve digital literacy and encourage citizen engagement with historical records.
  • Online Publishing of Historical Records – projects to publish historical records online, including, compiling, digitizing, transcribing, and annotating documentary source materials.
  • Publishing Historical Records Online: Transition Support – projects to assist print-only documentary editions and documentary editions available only through paid subscriptions to complete their projects and/or provide free online access.
  • State Board Programming Grants – projects by state historical records advisory boards to enhance access to historical records, increase citizen engagement with records, and provide learning and development opportunities for students, citizens and professional archivists.
  • State Government Electronic Records — projects to accession, describe, preserve, and provide access to state government electronic records of enduring value.

If approved by the Commission, when do these changes take effect?
The changes begin in the next grants cycle, affecting project beginning in 2015.  Deadlines are to be determined and will vary among programs. We have not changed our policy on draft applications; those may be submitted two months before the final deadlines, giving staff enough time to review and share suggestions with you. Please check our Grant Announcement page in mid-April.

Why are you proposing these these changes?

The NHPRC has long been focused on supporting public access to the nation’s most significant historical records, and toward that end, we began funding documentary editions of those records in the 1960s. In the mid-1970s, our mission expanded to include funding projects at the state level and records preservation and access.

Over the past two years, the NHPRC staff has been reviewing the grants programs and Commission priorities with external advisors, representatives of professional associations, the Commissioners, leadership at the National Archives, and the Archivist of the United States. We have conducted a review of research and literature of the various archives and editing fields. Complementing new initiatives at the National Archives that emphasize access and use of the records of government, we will publish a new report The Digital Citizen and the American Record, which has three overarching Calls to Action:

  1. Accelerate digital literacy and citizen engagement.
  2. Create a National Partnership for Digital Government with state and local government archives.
  3. Expand online publishing of historical records.

With these goals in mind, we redesigned the new programs for our upcoming grant cycles.

Where do I go to find more information?

We’ve created a section on our blog Annotation (http://blogs.archives.gov/nhprc/ ) which includes an overview of each proposed program, a PDF of the Draft Grant Announcement, and information on how to participate in webinar discussions over the next two weeks.  We welcome your comments and encourage you to share your ideas.

I have received NHPRC grants for an ongoing historical documentary edition. What do these proposed changes mean to my project?

Ongoing documentary edition projects have two options. If you are already publishing an online edition that provides free access to the public, you should apply under the Online Publishing of Historical Records category.

If you are an ongoing documentary edition that has received NHPRC grants but you do not provide free online access to your edition, you should apply under the Publishing Historical Records Online: Transition Support category.  Our hope is that grant funds will assist you in online publication of your work. However, there are a small number of projects that cannot publish online editions or provide free access. We will provide funds for print-only projects as long as their completion date is no later than FY 2018.

What do you mean by “free online access?”

People should be able to view your entire online collection for free, without having to pay fees or subscriptions. Ideally, the entire collection should be fully searchable as well.  However, we consider a PDF of individual print volumes available for free on the web as meeting the requirement. If you have some other method of providing free online access, please let us know.

We want to digitize already-processed collections and put them online. Where do we go?

The NHPRC considers digitizing collections for online access as a preliminary form of publishing. We no longer support a stand-alone Digitization grant program, and you should apply under the Online Publishing of Historical Records program.  We have increased the number and budget of the new program to accommodate new digital projects.

We need to process archival collections and may want to put these materials online.  Where do we go?

For archival processing of historical records, read the grant announcement entitled Access to Historical Records.  If as part of the project plans, you also want to digitize records, you may include that activity in the proposal.

We have an electronic records processing and access project, and in the past, NHPRC has offered grants in Electronic Records. Where do we go?

If your institution is a state archives and you are interested in preserving and making available your permanent records, or in expanding your capacity to do so, you should apply in the State Government Electronic Records category. The aim of this category is to build capacity in the states for access to government electronic records. The program also encourages collaboration, so if your state archives wants to work with other types of archives to develop this capacity, the NHPRC will welcome those applications.

If your project is to process and provide access to your institution’s electronic records or those collections deposited in your repository, you should apply under the Access to Historical Records category.

What else is eligible under the proposed Access to Historical Records category?

Traditional archives processing projects that may include a digitization component as a part of your processing activities, electronic records processing, preservation digitization or reformatting of unstable audio and visual records.

What is new about the State Board Programming Grants category?

As before, only state boards, or their fiscal agents, are eligible to apply. Our intent is to promote projects at the boards that emphasize public access to historical records within the state. We are encouraging state boards to take innovative and creative approaches to meet this goal.

What kinds of projects are you looking for under the proposed Literacy and Engagement with Historical Records category?

Our initial emphasis is in three areas: educational partnerships to teach digital archiving skills; innovative tools and applications, include mobile apps; and new or ongoing efforts to use crowdsourcing to provide greater access to online historical records.



The NHPRC has long been focused on providing public access to the nation’s most significant historical records. With this purpose in mind, it has funded documentary editions of those records for many years, first in print editions and later as well in digital formats online.

The Commission wishes to expand its support of online publishing to enhance online public access to primary sources.  Grants will be awarded for all stages of publishing historical records online, including, compiling, digitizing, transcribing, and annotating documentary source materials. In particular, the Commission seeks applications that focus on digitizing, transcribing, annotating, or any combination of these core activities. Digitizing activities are included in this program as a preliminary form of publishing online. Applications are welcome from both documentary editing projects and from archives and other repositories with primary source materials looking to publish major collections of historical records online.

Both traditional documentary editions which publish in print and online formats and new digital projects are encouraged to apply for support.  The NHPRC will not support print-only editions in this grant program.

All ongoing documentary editions that have received NHPRC grants but do not publish an online edition or do not provide free public access to your edition should apply for support in the Publishing Historical Records Online: Transition Support grant program.  Our hope is that grant funds will assist you in going online. However, there are a small number of projects that cannot publish online editions or provide free access. We may provide funds for print-only projects that currently receive NHPRC support, as long as their completion date is no later than FY 2018.

Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American life or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, business, social reform, the arts, and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project. The Commission will not consider proposals that charge for access.

 

Further details about Online Publishing of Historical Records:

  • Draft (optional):   TO BE DETERMINED; Final Deadline:   TO BE DETERMINED

Award amounts can range from $20,000 to $175,000 per year. The Commission expects to make as many as 35 grants in this category, for a total of up to $2,500,000

Please read the Online Publishing of Historical Records draft announcement.

Further details about Publishing Historical Records Online: Transition Support:

  • Draft (optional):   TO BE DETERMINED; Final Deadline:   TO BE DETERMINED

Award amounts may range from $30,000 to $175,000. The Commission expects to make as many as 8 grants in this category, for a total of up to $700,000.

Please read the Publishing Historical Records Online: Transition Support  draft announcement.

We welcome your comments here on the NHPRC blog – please supply any comments by March 31st. 

 

The first webinar was held on February 20, 2014: To listen to a digital recording of this call, dial the USA Toll-free telephone number 877-471-6587 or USA Caller Paid telephone number 1-402-970-2667 and enter program ID 215031941001.

The second webinar was held on  February 25, 2014. To listen to a recording, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=89DBFB3E-458E-491F-A85A-EDDE3C63CCC4

Literacy and Engagement

by on February 12, 2014


The National Archives has launched several new projects to encourage people to become “citizen archivists” and join in crowdsourcing efforts to improve historical records content online. At the same time, it has become clear that greater levels of digital literacy and understanding are necessary to ensure that people can not only access historical records but preserve and publish their own documents and archives.

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission has created a new grant program to explore ways to improve digital literacy for archives users and encourage citizen engagement with historical records. We invite your comments and suggestions for this new program.

The Literacy and Engagement grant program offers support for projects that will result in archives reaching audiences through digital literacy programs and workshops, new tools and applications, and active citizen engagement in archival processes.

Our initial emphasis is in three areas: educational partnerships to teach digital archiving skills; innovative tools and applications, include mobile apps; and new or ongoing efforts to use crowdsourcing to provide greater access to online historical records.

The NHPRC is looking to fund pilot projects to:

  1. Develop partnerships among archival repositories and educational institutions to teach people, particularly students, how to find, evaluate, and use primary source documents using digital technologies. The NHPRC seeks to support outreach programs for personal digital archiving; digital archives curriculum development; and similar efforts to teach digital literacy skills to historical records users.
  2. Create or develop new online tools and applications, including mobile apps, to enhance public understanding and access to historical records.
  3. Enlist “citizen archivists” in projects to accelerate digitization and online public access to historical records. This may include, but is not limited to, improving crowdsourcing efforts for identifying, tagging, transcribing, annotating, or otherwise enhancing digitized historical records.

The Commission expects to make up to six grants of between $50,000 and $150,000. The total amount allocated for this program is up to $500,000. Grants begin no earlier than TO BE DETERMINED (TBD).

Application deadlines: DRAFT TBD; FINAL TBD.

Please read the Literacy & Engagement with Historical Records Grant Announcement [PDF]. We welcome your comments here on the NHPRC blog – please supply any comments by March 31, 2014.

A recording of a February 24 webinar on this topic is available at https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=CEC503A6-EE8F-462C-96AB-3D3CA65F9E37

State Board Programming Grants

by on February 12, 2014


State Historical Records Advisory Boards assist the National Historical Publications and Records Commission in carrying out its mission and extending its reach through state-based activities. The NHPRC is revising its state board grants program to focus on public programming that results in enhanced online access to records, increased public understanding and use of archives, and collaborative approaches to statewide services or problem solving among multiple repositories or parties. We invite your comments and suggestions for this revised program.

The Commission will award grants to state boards to:

  • Provide educational and outreach programs, workshops, and other activities that enhance citizen and student engagement with historical records.
  • Operate state-based regrant and scholarship programs that advance access to historical records.
  • Collaborate on projects with other organizations to address common problems or shared opportunities within a state or among a consortium of state archives.
  • Hold or participate in meetings and public forums on statewide or national archival issues.

The NHPRC expects to award approximately 20 grants in this program. The total amount allocated for this program is up to $700,000. Grants begin no earlier than TO BE DETERMINED (TBD).

Proposed application deadlines: DRAFT TBD; FINAL TBD.

Please read the attached State Board Programming Grants DRAFT announcement [PDF]. We welcome public comments on this draft by March 31, 2014.

To listen to a recording of this webinar, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=3D1F07CE-4FE8-438F-88B7-9E72302C378F

 



Government information maintained by state archives is a unique national asset, serving as an important resource for documenting rights and capturing the national experience. As part of its initiative to create a National Partnership for Digital Government, the NHPRC seeks to support state archives in preserving and providing access to their government electronic record holdings.

The Commission’s new approach will focus on projects that accession, describe, preserve, and provide access to state government electronic records of enduring value. The NHPRC will support projects that actively engage in activities that preserve electronic record assets and make them available for public discovery.

The Commission encourages collaborative projects that bring together multiple parties to plan for and carry out project goals and outcomes. The NHPRC strongly encourages applicants to leverage the resources resulting from the Council of State Archivists’ State Electronic Records Initiative (SERI) to inform their work.

The Commission expects to make up to 3 grants in this program, for a total of up to $600,000. Grants begin no earlier than TO BE DETERMINED (TBD).

Please note: if your institution is seeking support to process and preserve electronic records of national significance, but it is not a state archives, please review the Commission’s Access to Historical Records grant announcement.

Application deadlines: DRAFT TBD; FINAL TBD

Please read the attached State Government Electronic Records draft grant announcement [PDF].  We welcome your comments here on the NHPRC blog – please supply any comments by March 31, 2014.

To listen to the February 25 webinar discussion of this program, go to https://connect16.uc.att.com/gsa1/meet/?RecordingKey=BC10F41D-CA17-4DE2-B1A7-70C78C97B9CC