Site search

Site menu:

Find Out More

Subscribe to Email Updates

Archives

Categories

Contact Us

“The Documents”

In celebration of American Archives Month, the National Archives is teaming up with the Academy of American Poets. Throughout the month we’ll be publishing original poems inspired by the holdings of the National Archives. To view the poets performing their original work, visit the National Archives YouTube Channel. 

Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom, 2014. <br> (Photo by Jeff Reed)

Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom, 2014.
(Photo by Jeff Reed)

Today’s poem, “The Documents” by Terence Winch, was inspired by his visit to the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.

The National Archives collects, preserves, and makes available the official documents created by the U.S. Government. These records help us claim our rights and entitlements as citizens; they help us hold our elected officials accountable for their actions; and they help document our history as a nation.

The National Archives Museum offers visitors many opportunities to view and interpret our government’s records.

In the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom, visitors can be inspired by our nation’s founding documents—the Declaration of Independence, Constitution of the United States, and Bill of Rights, which are on permanent display.

In the Rubenstein Gallery, visitors can explore the “Records of Rights” exhibit to learn how Americans sought to fulfill the promises our founding documents or see a rare copy of the Magna Carta.

Or, walk through the Public Vaults exhibit for a behind-the-scenes look at the original … [ Read all ]

Virtual Genealogy Fair, October 28–30, 2014

Learn Genealogy from the Comfort of Your Own Home: The 2014 Virtual Genealogy Fair, October 2830, 2014

Today’s post comes from Rebecca K. Sharp, Archives Specialist at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 

Why did the chicken need glasses? Find out by tuning into "Patently Amazing: Finding Your Family in Patent Records" at 3:00 PM EDT on Thursday, October 30, 2014.   (National Archives Identifier 7460045)

Why did the chicken need glasses? Find out by tuning into “Patently Amazing: Finding Your Family in Patent Records” at 3 p.m. (Eastern Time) on Thursday, October 30.
(National Archives Identifier 7460045)

Was your ancestor a drayman (cart driver), a hod carrier (a laborer who carried supplies to stone masons or bricklayers), a huckster (peddler), an ostler (a groom or stable hand), or a spinster (an unmarried woman)?

Discover the answers to these questions and much more through genealogical research.

Whether you are beginning your research or are an experienced genealogist, tune in to the National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) Virtual Genealogy Fair.

This three-day online event will be held October 2830. It’s free, and registration is not needed. Real-time captioning will be available for all sessions through Streamtext.

Our speakers include staff from NARA research facilities nationwide highlighting the holdings of the National Archives at Atlanta, Georgia; Boston, Massachusetts; College Park, Maryland; Denver, Colorado; Fort Worth, Texas; Kansas City, Missouri; St. Louis, Missouri; and Washington, DC.

Guest speakers include the Historian from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, and representatives from genealogical websites.

When Saying “I Do”… Find out more on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at Noon EDT.

“When Saying

[ Read all ]

Three Mathew Brady Photographs

In celebration of American Archives Month, the National Archives is teaming up with the Academy of American Poets. Throughout the month we’ll be publishing original poems inspired by the holdings of the National Archives. To view the poets performing their original work, visit the National Archives YouTube Channel. 

Confederate dead behind stone wall. The 6th. Maine Inf. penetrated the Confederate lines at this point. Fredericksburg, VA, 1863. (National Archives Identifier 524930)

Confederate dead behind stone wall. The 6th. Maine Inf. penetrated the Confederate lines at this point. Fredericksburg, VA, 1863. (National Archives Identifier 524930)

Today we have three poems by Eric Pankey, who was inspired by Mathew Brady’s Civil War–era photographs.

Noted photographer Mathew Brady and his associates produced several thousand photographs of battlefields, towns, and people affected by the Civil War.

Among the various scenes the photographers captured were these haunting images related to the Battle of Chancellorsville.

The Battle of Chancellorsville took place between April 30 and May 6, 1863, in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. The battle saw Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s 60,000 men face Union Army Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker’s Army of the Potomac, who had more than double in force.

Despite an unlikely Confederate victory, the Confederates sustained heavy losses.

Brady shocked many people when he displayed images of dead soldiers from the battle of Antietam the previous year. Americans were unaccustomed to seeing the reality of war.

Although many photos in the National Archives are attributed to Brady, many were taken by others under his supervision. When Brady … [ Read all ]

Making Room for Records

Continuing our celebration of American Archives month, today’s post comes from Christina James, intern in the National Archives History Office.

Photograph of the Inner Court of Archives Building, 12/21/1935. (National Archives Identifier: 7820485) This inner courtyard was filled in shortly after the construction of the National Archives Building to increase the building’s storage capacity.

Photograph of the Inner Court of Archives Building, 12/21/1935. (National Archives Identifier: 7820485)
This inner courtyard was filled in shortly after the construction of the National Archives Building to increase the building’s storage capacity.

Since it opened and began accepting records in 1935, the National Archives has had to face the issue of space. Housing the records of the Federal Government is no small task, even when only 1-3 percent of the government’s records are held in perpetuity.

In the decades since its establishment, the National Archives has addressed its storage needs in a number of ways, some more effective than others.

The National Archives first confronted the growing mountain of records it faced by increasing storage space at the National Archives Building. The building’s architect, John Russell Pope had designed the building to have an interior courtyard, which could be converted to storage place at some point.

This courtyard was almost immediately filled in to expand the building’s stack area and nearly double the building’s storage space. This addition to the building was completed in 1937, but again in the late 1960s, the National Archives Building reached its storage capacity.

Photograph of Veterans Bureau Records in Stack Areas 06/12/1936. (National Archives Identifier: 7820633) The records of the Veterans Bureau were among the first groups of records to be transferred to the National Archives. At the time this photo was taken, the National Archives had accessioned 58,800 cubic feet of records, mostly from the Veterans Bureau and the U.S. Food Administration.

Photograph of Veterans Bureau Records in Stack Areas, 06/12/1936. (National Archives Identifier: 7820633) The

[ Read all ]

“A Carpapalooza: An American Anthem”

In celebration of American Archives Month, the National Archives is teaming up with the Academy of American Poets. Throughout the month we’ll be publishing original poems inspired by the holdings of the National Archives. To view the poets performing their original works, visit the National Archives YouTube Channel. 

Poster, "Eat the Carp!" 1911. (National Archives Identifier 5710027)

Poster, “Eat the Carp!”
1911. (National Archives Identifier 5710027)

Today’s poem, “A Carpapalooza: An American Anthem” by Regie Cabico, was inspired by documents from the National Archives exhibit “What’s Cooking Uncle Sam.”

The exhibit is currently traveling, and you can still see highlights online.

Using original documents from the nationwide holdings of the National Archives, the exhibit explored the Government’s efforts to inspire, influence, and control what Americans eat and the unexpected consequences, dismal failures, and life-saving successes of those efforts.

For example, this 1911 Bureau of Fisheries poster encouraged Americans to eat carp—a fish that was introduced to American waters in 1877 and quickly proliferated.

Documents like these trace the origins of government programs and legislation aimed at ensuring that the American food supply is ample, safe, and nutritious. They also reflect the effects the Government has had on our food choices and preferences.

Sometimes comic and sometimes tragic, the records reveal the evolution of our beliefs and feelings about food.

A Carpapalooza: An American Anthem (Excerpt)

by Regie Cabico

I can write about colonialism,
Disney, riots and … [ Read all ]