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Archive for 'Photo Caption Contest'

Thursday Photo Caption Contest: July 12

"A clever idea, however the frivolity came to a swift end when Doolittle arrived for a surprise inspection."

It’s been hot here in Washington, DC.

So hot that a plane got stuck in “soft spot” in the asphalt of the runway at Reagan National Airport just across the river in Alexandria, Virginia.

So hot that our brains melted and we could not choose a winner from last week’s caption contest. So we turned to the freshest, youngest brain we could find in the office. Our new intern, YouTube whiz and future Pieces of History blogger Nikita Buley, agreed to pick the winner.

Congratulations to Tom! Check your email for a discount code for 15% off in our eStore.

So were these men hauling a plane off an overheated runway? Well, although it looks hot, the answer is no. Instead, it turns out that life does imitate art. These men are the actual crew of the place, and they are imitating the images of themselves on the plane!

According to the original caption: “B-29 Men bombed Tokyo. The crew of ‘Waddy’s Wagon,’ fifth B-29 to take off on the initial Tokyo mission from Saipan, and first to land after bombing the target. Crew members, posing here to duplicate their caricatures on the plane, are : Plane C. O., Capt. Walter R. ‘Waddy’ Young, Ponca City, Okla., … [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest: June 28

“Are you sure this is the way out of Vietnam?”

We waded into your captions like a man driving a car into a lake! How to choose between splashy captions that referenced Secret Service men wearing floaties, the Aflac duck, James Bond, or water taxis?

Waterlogged with indecision, we turned to Liza Talbot, who in turn turned to the crew of the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library. Congratulations to John M. Dooley! Your caption was the winner, “chosen by majority vote by the entire archival staff at the LBJ Library,” according to Liza.

John, check your email for a 15% discount code at the National Archives e-Store!

So, is this car rated for water excursions? Well, it is an actual amphibious car. In this photo from 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson took a ride with friends in his Amphicar.  LBJ is steering his land-to-water vehicle into a lake at his ranch in Stonewall, Texas (4/11/65).

Today’s photograph features a vehicle and some unusual passengers, but no water in sight. Give us your best caption in the comments below!

Your caption here!

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Thursday Photo Caption Contest: June 21

"Underdog Bess readies for the hand to drop, certain that, in this heat of the race, she shall be faster than Fido."

Nothing is sweeter than a girl and her dog . . . competing for treats? We enjoyed your captions suggesting the competition between a girl and her same-size canine companion, but like this little girl, the winner seemed just out of our grasp.

So we turned to guest judge Sarah Malcolm, who writes for the blog “In Roosevelt History” for the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library. Sarah has had experience with historic dogs: the blog has featured Fala’s Christmas stocking and little sailor hat!

Congratulations to Amanda! Sarah chose your caption as the winner! Check your e-mail for a treat—er, code for 15% in the eStore.

Although Fala might be the most famous of the Roosevelts’ dogs, this is a different Scottish terrier from decades before Fala joined the family. This photograph was taken in 1907. The dog, Duffy, is competing with Anna Roosevelt for a treat from the hand of FDR (who is standing over them, not yet stricken by polio).

It’s very, very hot in Washington, DC, today and so we couldn’t resist a picture that made us feel cool. Give us your wittiest caption in the comment below!

Your caption here!

[ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest: June 14

"Google’s Search Engine backroom, circa 1948"

We got a kick out of your captions, especially the suggestion that Fala might still be alive, stored in an archival box for preservation.  (Who knows, there are all kinds of things in our holdings, from nuclear plugs to mole skins!) We had a hard time choosing this week’s winner from among the slighty salacious “drawers” to the FOIA requests to the Archives bowling team.

Finally, we turned to someone who has been among the boxes, working under a single lightbulb: Paul Wester, Jr., the Chief Records Officer at the National Archives and blogger over at Records Express.

Congratulations to Nuno Guerreiro Josué! Paul chose your caption as the winner! Check your email for a code for 15% off at the eStore.

So what’s really happening in our last image? Well, these are real National Archives staff hard at work! This photograph is part of our “Historic Photograph File of National Archives Events and Personnel.” The original caption reads: “Navy Archives Personnel, Bess Glenn in foreground, August 14, 1942.”

This week, there are no workers, but man’s best friend seems to be working hard. Give us your best caption in the comments below!

Your caption here!

[ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest–May 23

"Darling! Wait! You forgot to pack your sandwich!"

Trying to choose a winner from last winner’s caption contest got us all tangled up! How could we choose between balloon references, Air Force One, and the horrors of flying coach? Eventually we had to hand over our judging duties over to Natalie Rocchio, archives specialist in the Center for Legislative Archives. Natalie knows how to pick out something fascinating: she is the blogging power behind Congress in the Archives.

Congratulations to Gary! Natalie choose your quote as the winner. Check your email for a 15% discount to the eStore.

Although this photograph might evoke memories of Mom or Dad chasing down the school bus and waving a brown paper bag, the man in this photograph is actually coming down, not going up. The photograph was taken during World War I: “Returning from a U-Boat scouting party. Aerial naval observer coming down from a ‘Blimp’ type balloon after a scouting tour somewhere on the Atlantic Coast. Central News Photo Service., ca. 1918.” (ARC 533474; 165-WW-63C(10))

Today’s photograph has us back inside and firmly on (or even under) the ground! Give us your wittiest caption in the comments below.

"Your caption here!"

[ Read all ]