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Archive for 'Photo Caption Contest'

Thursday Photo Caption Contest–March 1

Apparently the sight of a scantily clad man engrossed in his knitting fired up the imaginations of our readers! We made a cup of tea and settled down to knit one, purl two our way through your many caption submissions. Leg warmers! Greek mythology! Puns! Poor fashion sense!

We became so tangled that we turned to guest judge Lynn Bassanese, the Acting Director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library, to decide which captions to cast off.

Congratulations to James! (Check your email for a code for 15% off in your eStore.) Lynn chose your caption as the winner. “Eleanor Roosevelt was a knitter and we have many of her knitting needles and projects in our museum collection,” said Lynn. ”She would applaud this young man’s efforts!”

This photograph comes from the holdings of the FDR Library, but its World War II  context is not quite so sunny as the stoop in the picture. The original caption reads:  ”Believed to be Italian nationals in a U. S. Detention camp.”

Today’s photo also features men, but they seem to be engaged in a more traditionally masculine activity! Give us your wittiest caption in the comments below!… [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest–February 16

Choosing last week’s winner was a tough nut–er, lobster?–to crack, so we turned to Tammy Kelly, our crack judge at the Truman Library.

Congratulation to RJ! Check your email for a code to use for a 15% discount at our eStore! Tammy chose your caption as the winner. Perhaps she was reminded of the fine collection of hats that Bess Truman wore throughout her life (featured on Millinery Monday).

Tammy kept her reasons for choosing RJ’s caption under her hat, but she did reveal that this image was taken by Abbie Rowe at the Maine State Society Lobster Dinner in the Department of the Interior cafeteria on February 21, 1951. The lobster-demolishing pair are Senator Owen Brewster and fellow guest Ann Chapman (wife of Oscar Chapman, Secretary of the Interior).

There’s no lobster in today’s photograph, but there are some….really large microphones? Give us your wittiest caption in the comments below!… [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest–February 9

Who knew that the “LB” in LBJ stood for “light bulb”? Apparently, quite a few of you! We were buzzing with excitement after reading your captions, and we needed to ground ourselves.

So we turned to our guest judge, Liza Talbot, who is an archivist at the Johnson Presidential Library and the mastermind behind the LBJ Timemachine. (Don’t miss today’s post of wartime footage shot by LBJ himself!)

Congratulations to  Steve—Liza thought your caption was electrifying! Check your email for a code to get a 15% discount in our eStore.

So why was the future President looking so concerned? Congressman Lyndon B. Johnson was working to get public power to the people in the Texas countryside. This photo of Mrs. Mattie Malone and LBJ was taken by a photographer for the Austin American-Statesman in May 1941 during LBJ’s campaign for Senate.

Today’s photograph features a couple and a couple of lobsters. Get cracking and put your funniest caption in the comments below!… [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest–February 2

We had a hard time choosing a caption for last week’s photograph. How can you choose between captions that poke gentle fun at fortune cookies, “rags to riches” stories, and the IRS?

We turned to a guest judge who knows paper records really, really well. Paul Palermo is the Director of Records Center Operations at the National Archives at Boston, MA, which provides storage for thousands of temporary Federal records.

Not all of the records created by the Federal Government are kept forever in the  National Archives. The majority of Federal records—about 95%—are considered “temporary” and are kept for set periods of time.  Paul and his team manage the lifecycle of these records. They store them, track them, pull them and  send them back to the creating agency if they are needed, and put returned records back on the shelf.  They also destroy nonpermanant records at the end of their lifecycle or make sure that other records go to the National Archives as permanent records. (You can read more about temporary records here).

Congratulations to Deirdre! Paul tore himself away from a busy job (see the paragraph above!) to choose your caption as the winner of last’s contest.  Check your email for a code to use for a 15% discount at our eStore.

Like our guest judge, the ladies above worked in Massachusetts. Unfortunately, if they time traveled to the present day, most likely … [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest—January 19

Are you ready to return to captioning? Can you rewrite history with a humorous twist? Well, we’re back! We’ve been scouring the digital archives looking for the finest photographs. We’re lining up guest judges. We’re setting aside the wacky, the wonderful, and the wordless images from our holdings.

And we’re looking forward to all your entries! The winner receives a 15% discount to the National Archives eStore and our undying admiration.

Here’s our first photograph for the 2012 caption season—put your best caption in the comments below!… [ Read all ]