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Archive for 'Photo Caption Contest'

Thursday Photo Caption Contest!

Our featured cat is Socks, who was photographed at the White House in December of 1993. So we asked Terri Garner, director of the Clinton Presidential Library, to be our guest judge. There was a lot of debate and discussion in Little Rock, but she emailed us a winner today.

Congratulations to Jean West! Terri chose your caption on Facebook as the winner for the special LOL cat edition. Please email us at public.affairs@nara.gov to receive your 15% discount in our eStore.

And if you would like to see more of Socks, check out the full set of photographs on Flickr from the William J. Clinton Presidential Library.

The Thursday Photo Caption Contest will return in January 2012 with more humorous images from our holdings.

Happy Holidays!… [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption

"Susan had always been a diligent student, but now she began to suspect that her master’s thesis was getting a little bit out of control."

Last week’s image may have sparked some of our best captions yet! Apparently a giant roll of paper makes our readers think of their experiences in the National Archives research room, Twitter, and toilet paper at the State Department.

But it reminded us of another enormous rolled document featured on Pieces of History: a 1954 petition from Hawaii. And so we asked conservator Morgan Zinsmeister, who worked on that outsized record, to choose a winner.

Congratulations to Jill! Morgan thought your caption was the one we should preserve as the winner.

So what is really happening here? It turns out we made the right connection in thinking of Morgan and his Hawaiian petition. This photograph is from the “Historic Photograph File of National Archives Events and Personnel, 1935–1975,” and it shows Archives employee Kay Brewington examining a large petition. (We admire her ability to crouch gracefully in that dress and those shoes!)

Today’s photograph also shows a woman hard at work under the glare of a bare lightbulb—but what is she teaching? Give us your best caption in the comments below!

Your caption here!

 … [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

Innovative as a wedding planner, Mary Ellen McKinna’s idea of tying glass bottles to the bumpers of newlyweds’ cars became much more practical with the invention of plastic a year later.

We enjoyed the many old fashioned names that our captioners suggested: Ellie Mae, Mildred, Ethel, and Frances! I wonder what the subject of our photo would say in response to the captions that suggest she is in the clutches of an OCD attack or is cooking up something  explosive?

This week’s judge knows something about cooking up crazy ideas! Like an archives-loving Dr. Frankenstein, Stephanie Greenhut brings history to life on DocsTeach, a web site where  teachers can create and use lesson plans featuring National Archives documents.

Choosing a caption was hard work; Stephanie’s colleagues wondered why she was laughing so hard at her desk. But through her tears of amusement she was able to make a decision. Congratulations to Ryan! Check your e-mail for a code for 15% off in the eStore!

So, what exactly is she doing? The answer is far more mundane. According to the original caption: “Millville, New Jersey – Glass bottles. A wash and tie girl tying stoppers to bottles. This is one of the few unskilled jobs for women in the glass factory. A wash and tie girl takes the bottle from the stopper grinders, washes it with automatic sprayers and ties the stopper to … [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

Hortence was delighted that the sculptor had captured her and Arnold on their honeymoon so exactly.

We were amused by all your suggestions of light-fingered artists and wild wedding cake toppers, but we were most impressed that several of our captioners knew who the artist was—and what that outrageous piece of silver was!

In the end, we picked up our editorial trident and poked Darren Cole to make him pick a winner. Darren is one of the managers of Today’s Document, a Tumblr blog that brings you a piece of the National Archives every day, whether serious or silly.

Congratulations to Julie! Check your e-mail for a 15% discount in the eStore.

Judge Darren was the one who suggested the picture—and he thought the funniest thing about it was the original caption: “Matronly visitor to the National Gallery Washington, DC, scrutinizing Benvenuto Cellini’s ‘Salt Cellar’ on temporary exhibit, ca. 1947″ (ARC 541887).

This week’s photograph features a “matronly” lady, but no tridents! Give us your best caption in the comments below!

Your caption here!

[ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

"I got to get outta this place If it’s the last thing I ever do."

Choosing this week’s winner was a difficult as balancing a hat on a burro, so we turned to Mary Ryan, who has seen many strange yet historic images from the holdings of the National Archives in her role the managing editor of Prologue magazine.

Congratulations to Kim! Check your e-mail for a code for 15% off in the National Archives eStore.

Our guest judge recognized the setting of this picture from a Prologue article about the Mexican Punitive Expedition, but apparently this beast of burden was not being punished by the Army. The original caption reads “Privates Daly, Ball, and Baldwin, Company A, 16th Infantry, testing out the burro. This burro came to camp one day and ever afterward persisted in hanging around. September 29, 1916. 1922.”

This week’s image features a trio of people, but there are no burros in this one! Just an expression of surprise . . . or shock . . . or arty thoughtfulness. Give us your best caption in the comments below!

Your caption here

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