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Archive for '- Presidents'

Records of Rights Vote: The Immigration Act

Cast your vote for the Immigration Act to be displayed first in the new “Records of Rights” gallery. Polls close on November 15!

On November 13, 1954, Ellis Island closed. More than 20 million immigrants had been processed through the island station since its opening in 1892.

But immigration was still limited. From 1924 until 1965, a person’s place of birth often determined his or her ability to immigrate legally into the United States. Immigration laws favored people from northern and western Europe over those from southern and eastern Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Numerical limits, often called quotas, were assigned to each country. For example, a 1924 law allowed about 4,000 Italians to enter the United States annually while about 66,000 could emigrate from Great Britain. Asian immigrants, who entered the United States through Angel Island, were already largely banned from U.S immigration by other laws passed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

When President Johnson signed the 1965 amendments to the Immigration Reform Act of 1952, that system of country-based immigration quotas was ended.

“This system violated the basic principle of American democracy–the principle that values and rewards each man on the basis of his merit as a man,” said the President at the ceremony on Liberty Island.

The law authorized 120,000 immigration visas for people from the western hemisphere and … [ Read all ]

Free Film Festival in honor of Steven Spielberg

film festival

Now is your chance to ask Steven Spielberg a question on Twitter using the hashtag #askspielberg!

Over the next few weeks, Ken Burns will handpick several tweets and share the questions with the movie director. Spielberg will answer the questions at the at the Foundation for the National Archives 2013 Gala and Records of Achievement Award ceremony at the National Archives.

So tweet your question to @archivesfdn and use the hashtag #askspielberg.

The director is being honored by the Foundation for his film legacy, which has brought history to life on the big screen. The National Archives is celebrating the award with a film festival!

Presented in association with DreamWorks Studios, this free public film festival will showcase:

Free tickets will be distributed at the Special Events entrance to the National Archives at 7th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, beginning 60 minutes prior to showtime. Seating is limited and first-come, first-served.

For more information about the Spielberg Film Festival, visit http://www.archivesfoundation.org/programs/steven-spielberg-film-festival/

Spielberg is receiving the Records of Achievement Award, given to an individual whose work has fostered a broader national awareness of the history and identity of the … [ Read all ]

American Archives Month: Sarah Malcolm, Roosevelt Library

We’re kicking off Halloween week by heading over to the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, NY.

We asked archivist Sarah Malcolm about public misconceptions of her profession.

“The word archivist is a misconception in and of itself, since unfortunately most people aren’t sure what that word means,” Malcolm said. “Usually, the first question I get from people when I say that I am an archivist is, ‘So what do you do?’

“What an archivist is can be a range of things. Archivists work with collections and papers ranging from centuries ago to digital files being created today. We take care of these documents, photographs, audio and video recordings to make them accessible for people now and for generations to come. We preserve collections, create exhibits, answer peoples questions, and spend a lot of time getting dusty and dirty. We work in small historical societies, colleges and universities, corporate headquarters, government institutions, and everywhere else in between. We get to work with history every day, and that’s what makes being an archivist so unique and fun.”

Read on to learn more about Malcolm’s archival experiences!

Name: Sarah Malcolm

Occupation: Archivist at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library

How long have you worked at this library?

Three years, plus four summers of internships.

How/why did you decide to go into the archival field?

I fell in … [ Read all ]

American Archives Month: Ryan Rutkowski, Carter Presidential Library

We continue with our celebrations of American Archives Month with our series highlighting a few of the outstanding folks in our Presidential Libraries.

Archivist Ryan Rutkowski has crisscrossed the nation in his pursuit of public history. From San Francisco to Chicago to Wheeling, WV, Rutkowski has finally found a home under the southern sun in Atlanta, GA. Read on to find out about his duties as an archivist, and how his job once led him to play a priest on the History Channel.

Name: Ryan Rutkowski

Occupation: Archivist at Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum

How long have you worked at this library?

Almost two years.

How/why did you decide to go into the archival field?

When I was an undergraduate, I had an opportunity to volunteer and intern at the Archives for the Archdiocese of San Francisco during my senior year at the University of San Francisco. The archivist, who was also my professor, gave me a broad range of duties that include processing, cataloging, and answering research requests.

I was particularly amazed at the rich history that was being preserved there, from the Mission Dolores artifacts dating to the 1700s to the sacramental records that were saved from parishes destroyed in the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906. I enjoyed working hands with the material and provide research assistants to variety of clients. After this experience, I decide to pursue a Master’s degree in Public History … [ Read all ]

American Archives Month: Kim Coryat, Clinton Presidential Library

American Archives Month has one week to go, and we’ve still got so much to share about the hard-working archivists in our Presidential Libraries! This post takes us out to Little Rock, AR, where we learn about this archivist’s responsibilities, experiences, and why she’s Team Socks.

Name: Kim Coryat

Occupation: Textual archivist at the William J. Clinton Presidential Library

How long have you worked at this library?

I was originally hired as a Museum Office Assistant in December 2004, about two weeks after the library opened.

How/why did you decide to go into the archival field?

Within a few months of my arrival in Little Rock, I realized that there was a job here at the Clinton Library for which I was eminently suited. I was an American History major in grad school, and have always been a huge politics nerd. Archivists at Presidential Libraries combine history, politics, and my other great love–reading, all into one big pile, and they mentally feast on it! The best part is they actually pay you to do this! From that point on I applied for every opening in the textual archives here at the Library. I was hired as an Archives Tech in 2006, and in 2009, they finally gave in and let me be an archivist. It’s what I should have done my entire life.

What are some [ Read all ]