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Archive for February, 2011

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

We’re excited to pass the winning torch to our reader  Michael P., whose caption met the high standard of our guest judge, National Archives editrix Maureen MacDonald.  

Congratulations, Michael P! You can use your 30% discount at the Archives eStore to buy something to read by lantern light.

The actual caption on the photo in the Kennedy Library is “Garnett D. Horner, reporter for the Washington Star and the out-going president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, presents two silver lanterns to President John F. Kennedy at the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner, Sheraton-Park Hotel, Washington, D.C. The lanterns are replicas of the lanterns hung in the Old North Church of Boston on April 18 ,1775.” (Kennedy Library, photo by Abbie Rowe, AR6378-M)

Maureen, a Bay State native herself, gave Curtis P’s caption an honorable mention: “Now, Mr. President. I know you’re from Massachusetts, but I’m sure it’s ‘One if by land, two if by sea.’”

What’s the signal for bad weather in Massachusetts—and across the United States? Some of you are buried in snow, but these two ladies are ready for summer! Well, they’re ready for something. . . tell us what in the comments below!… [ Read all ]

Green Bay Packer, Detroit Lion, or US President?

These days, the average NFL player receives about $1.2 million a year, not a bad paycheck for throwing around the old pigskin. After all, that’s three times what the President makes (though he does get free limo rides), and plenty more than your average blogger does (sigh).

But in 1935, playing football wasn’t the glitzy well-funded enterprise it is today. That’s the year the Green Bay Packers went looking for a center, and found future President Gerald Ford. They offered President Ford $110 bucks a game.  Over the course of a season—14 games—that means Ford would’ve squirreled away $1,540, about $24,000 bucks in 2011 dollars, if he had accepted the draft deal.

Ford declined this offer, and another offer from the Detroit Lions to play professional football, and instead made his way over into Yale to study law, then to the Navy to serve his country, then to the House of Representatives, and finally to the White House where, thankfully, the salary was a bit better.

You can learn more at the Gerald Ford Presidential Library’s Facebook page.… [ Read all ]