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Tag: conservation

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

Since last week’s photo came from holdings at the National Archives at Chicago, we thought, what could be more appropriate than getting one of our Windy City colleagues to be our guest judge? Regional Office Management Assistant Mary Ann Zulevic stepped in for the duty and, after much deliberation, debating, and pondering, picked this genealogical joke for the win.

Congratulations to Alexis Hill! Check your e-mail for a code for 15% off in the eStore. We’ve got lots of goodies for all the knots in your family tree.

The original caption for the photo is: “On Demonstration Trail, ‘Trees for Tomorrow’ Conservation Workshop, at Eagle River. Walt Nicewander shows 2 teachers a knotty, low-grade bd. Produced by limby trees such as white pine to the left. Vilas Co. Wis. 07/1960″ (Records of the Forest Service, RG 95; ARC 2131639).

I don’t know if the men in this week’s photo for caption are from the same family tree, but they sure seem close. Put your best captions in the comments section below! We’ll reconvene again next week to pick a winner—same time, same place.

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What’s Cooking Wednesday: Pull out that sweet tooth!

To celebrate our new exhibit “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?” we are featuring a food-related blog post every Wednesday. Today’s post comes to us from the National Archives at New York City.

“Do you know that the money spent in the United States for candy in one year is double the amount required to feed Belgium for one year?” This statement is not from a modern anti-obesity polemic, but rather from the World War I pamphlet A Sugar Program: Household Conservation Policy to Meet the Sugar Situation for the Summer of 1918.

Why was there a sugar situation? When the United States entered World War I, ships were needed to transport soldiers and supplies across the ocean. Since much of the U.S. supply of sugar was imported, the war interrupted the supply chain of sugar.

Ships crossing over to the United Kingdom with supplies also faced the dreaded German U-boats, which sank large numbers of the Allied merchant fleet when Germany declared unrestricted submarine warfare in 1917. This danger threatened to worsen the Allied food situation in Europe, which was already severe. The woman in the poster above is literally draining away resources that the Allies need to win the war.

To inform U.S. citizens on why they were being asked to ration sugar (2 pounds per month or 6 teaspoons per day) and to provide them with information on how to manage without sugar, the … [ Read all ]