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Tag: Eisenhower

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Top Ten Food Records of 2011

As 2011 draws to a close, so does our exhibit “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?” which will end on January 3, 2012.

It’s been a great year for food here at the National Archives. We’ve had amazing guests come and speak, including Chef José Andrés, our neighbor and Chief Culinary Adviser for the exhibit; Chef Roland Mesnier, former White House pastry chef; Diana Kennedy, guru of Mexican food; Ann Harvey Yonkers, co-director of FRESHFARM markets; Jessica B. Harris, author of High on the Hog; and George Motz, author of Hamburger America.

And of course, we’ve been writing about food-related records in the National Archives almost every Wednesday since the exhibit opened. We thought it would be fun to look back at the Top Ten Food Records in honor of this exhibit. Since we couldn’t include all of the records, we chose the ones that were most striking, strange, or popular.

Here’s our Top Ten list of memorable food records!

TEN: My coworker was constantly amused by this label for “Grains of Health,” which is profuse in its praise but vague in its description of these grains might actually be. Her favorite line: “It is so prepared that the strongest and the most delicate person may drink it at the same table.”

 

NINE: “Pig Cafeteria” is a photograph of a USDA exhibit meant to inform farmers about hog nutrition. The … [ Read all ]

From Our Film Archives: “The March”

This Sunday is the anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. To commemorate the event, the National Archives is displaying a program from the march in the East Rotunda Gallery and screening The March on August 27 and 28.

But if you are not in Washington, DC, you can still watch the entire film on our YouTube channel.

The first reel of this documentary (embedded below) shows the lead-up to the march—from assembling thousand of picket signs to making 80,000 cheese sandwiches for bagged lunches to the long bus rides into the Washington, DC. The first 12 minutes gives a different view of the event from the usual clips of the March on Washington.

The film was directed by James Blue, who was later nominated for an Oscar in 1969 for another documentary, A Few Notes on Our Food Problem.

The March was made as part of a series of films created by the United States Information Agency (USIA), founded by President Dwight Eisenhower in 1953. These films were meant to promote American policies in foreign countries, without being overt propaganda. (You can read about the agency’s anticommunism message in this Text Message post about the race to the Moon.)

But these USIA films were rarely seen in America because of concerns about the U.S. Government propagandizing its own people. The 1948 Smith-Mundt Act mandated that no USIA film could be shown domestically … [ Read all ]

Strange bedfellows: Nixon, Bush, and Sawyer

More than 400 White House staff  came to see Richard Nixon say farewell at 9.32 a.m. in the East Room of the White House. And when Nixon and his family walked to the waiting helicopter, staff and guests crowded across the lawn and porch.

There were hundreds of people at the White House that historic morning. But politics does make strange bedfellows and three names in particular stand out from the pages of the daily White House diary entry for August 9.

David Eisenhower, the grandson of former President Dwight Eisenhower, was there. He made the long walk down the red carpet to the helicopter holding the hand of his wife, Julie, who was also Nixon’s daughter.

Her name does not appear on the  manifest of the helicopter that lifted off from the White House lawn. But when the President arrived at Andrews Air Force Base and then boarded Air Force One, a young Diane Sawyer joined him on the second aircraft. Sawyer had been working as a staff assistant in Nixon’s administration since 1970, and she followed the former President to California, where she helped him write his memoirs. She is currently the anchor for ABC World News.

And future President George H. W. Bush and his wife were there. Bush attended in his capacity as Chairman of the Republican National Convention. He also recorded his impressions of the events in his diary, revealing … [ Read all ]

The Queen’s Scones for a Wedding Breakfast

Welcome to our first “What’s Cooking Wednesday” here at Pieces of History!

We’re excited to make this first post in a series celebrating our new exhibit “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?” which looks at the role that the Federal Government has taken in Americans’ lives regarding food production, safety, advertising, and nutrition. It opens June 10, and we’ll be posting images, recipes, food challenges, and much more!

This recipe from Queen Elizabeth is featured in the upcoming exhibit, and it would make an excellent breakfast to eat as you watch the royal wedding on Friday.

Why does the National Archives have a recipe about scones from the British monarch? Since was sent to a President, it’s actually a Federal record.

In August 1959, Queen Elizabeth entertained President Dwight Eisenhower at Balmoral Castle in the Scottish Highlands. One of the dishes she served was drop scones. The next year, she was reminded of his visit and her promise to share the recipe, and she mailed it to him.

She included some help to make the recipes work for an American cook. She noted that treacle (sugar syrup) could be used for caster sugar. But you have to wonder, exactly how a big a teacup should the cook use?… [ Read all ]