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Tag: electricity

Thursday Photo Caption Contest–February 9

"Sock it to me LBJ"

Who knew that the “LB” in LBJ stood for “light bulb”? Apparently, quite a few of you! We were buzzing with excitement after reading your captions, and we needed to ground ourselves.

So we turned to our guest judge, Liza Talbot, who is an archivist at the Johnson Presidential Library and the mastermind behind the LBJ Timemachine. (Don’t miss today’s post of wartime footage shot by LBJ himself!)

Congratulations to  Steve—Liza thought your caption was electrifying! Check your email for a code to get a 15% discount in our eStore.

So why was the future President looking so concerned? Congressman Lyndon B. Johnson was working to get public power to the people in the Texas countryside. This photo of Mrs. Mattie Malone and LBJ was taken by a photographer for the Austin American-Statesman in May 1941 during LBJ’s campaign for Senate.

Today’s photograph features a couple and a couple of lobsters. Get cracking and put your funniest caption in the comments below!

"Your caption here!"

[ Read all ]

Beer = mc2

Albert Einstein's (

Albert Einstein (596270)

In 1885, Munich’s Oktoberfest was celebrated under the glow of the electric light for the first time. Who was responsible for that feat? None other than Albert Einstein himself.

Granted, it may have been his father and uncle who are truly due the credit (Albert was a teetotaling six-year-old at the time), but the math whiz extraordinaire was there checking wiring and ensuring that the Einstein Brothers lights stayed on at the world’s largest fair.

Despite this illuminating achievement, the future was not so bright for the young Einstein or his folks. By 1894, Albert’s uncle and father had mortgaged their home in a bid to grow their flourishing electric company. But the Oktoberfest contract was lost to Siemens, and the Einstein Brothers enterprise fell flat. The family moved to northern Italy to try their luck there, and instructed the  15-year-old Albert to remain in Munich to finish his schooling.

Albert had other ideas. By the next year, Albert had coaxed a doctor to diagnose him with nervous exhaustion which excused him from school (his teacher thought he was a nuisance anyway) and shortly thereafter he arrived on his parent’s doorstep in Italy. By his sixteenth birthday he had written his first essay on theoretical physics, “On the Investigation of the State of the Ether in a Magnetic Field.”

Still, school evaded … [ Read all ]