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Tag: Facial Hair Fridays

Facial Hair Friday: Hang ten, Pat Nixon!

First Lady Pat Nixon talking with surfers near Border Field, CA, on August 18, 1971. (Nixon Presidential Library)

Some time ago, a Facebook fan expressed thanks that we would never combine our First Ladies Friday with our Facial Hair Friday. To which we replied, never say never! Of course, the facial hair in this photograph is not on First Lady Pat Nixon, but that scraggly surfer goatee is in very close proximity to Pat, so we are going to count it as a two-for-one.

The First Lady had just finished a land-grant ceremony at Border Field, CA, to create a new park area at the U.S.-Mexico border for the Legacy of the Parks Program. Border Field State Park is 15 miles south of San Diego, CA. When the U.S.-Mexico War ended in 1848, delegations from both countries began surveying the boundary at this location in 1850. Border Monument number 258 can be seen from inside the park, but it no longer can be reached because there are border fences on both sides. When the First Lady was there, there was only barbed wire, and she was able to reach out and greet the Mexican citizens who had gathered on the other side.

The park is in the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve. Threatened and endangered birds like the Western Snowy Plover and the Light-footed Clapper Rail now live … [ Read all ]

Facial Hair Friday—Edward Bates

Edward Bates, Attorney General in the Lincoln administration. (ARC 528314; 111-B-4168)

Edward Bates, Attorney General in the Lincoln administration. (ARC 528314; 111-B-4168)

Edward Bates was living quietly and comfortably in 1860. He had been out of public life for two decades but now was being courted by backers for the highest office in the land. The new Republican Party’s nomination for President of the United States was wide open, and a number of contenders were vying for the prize.

Those who urged Bates to put his hat in the ring considered his standing as an elder statesman of Missouri (he’d arrived in St. Louis in 1814 and been a delegate to the state constitution convention) and his previous public service (state legislator, U.S. Representative, judge). Perhaps they were also swayed by his impressive whiskers, which give him a patriarchal air.

Bates did not win the nomination—a beardless lawyer from Illinois won the party’s backing and the Presidency. When the newly be-whiskered Abraham Lincoln was filling his Cabinet, though, he called on Bates to be his Attorney General. Bates was part of the unlikely “team of rivals” brought together by Lincoln. Two other former Presidential candidates, William Seward and Salmon P. Chase, were brought into the Cabinet as Secretary of State and Secretary of the Treasury. (Another member of the Cabinet, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton has been a Facial Hair Friday honoree.)

President Lincoln himself remarked on Edward … [ Read all ]

Hats off to Bess Truman!

Bess Truman's hat, 1906. (Truman Library)

Bess in a feathered hat, 1906. (Truman Library)

Here at Prologue: Pieces of History, we have Facial Hair Friday. On the Harry S. Truman Library’s Facebook page, they celebrate Millinery Monday! When I was very little, I loved poking through my mother’s old hatboxes stored in the basement. Alas, the era of wearing hats for every occasion had passed, but she had saved her favorites.

Bess Truman apparently did the same thing. The Truman Library has several of her hats and many more photographs of her in hats at various stages of her life. Scrolling through the Truman Library’s page is a good substitute for exploring my mother’s hatboxes. Not only do you get to see some remarkable chapeaux, but you also get to see the very stylish young Bess Wallace (and others) wearing the hats.

 Bess (left) with her best friend, Mary Paxton, ca. 1901. (Truman Library)

Bess Wallace (left) with her best friend, Mary Paxton, ca. 1901. (Truman Library)

Because Millinery Monday covers the span of Bess Truman’s life, we get to see how hat styles changed from the start of the 20th century through its late decades. We also get to see a part of the library’s collection that is not usually seen by the public. On the National Archives Facebook page, click through our list of “Favorite Pages” to find out more about the Presidential libraries, regional archives, and other units that are all … [ Read all ]

FHF: Santa in the 70s

santa

Santa Cruz, California. From Record Group 412: Records of the Environmental Protection Agency, 1944-2006. (412-DA-731; ARC 543224)

 

They just lit up the White House Christmas tree here in Washington, DC, and temperatures here have taken a North Pole-style turn for the worse (I am beginning to wonder if I’ll need to knit myself a neard).

So, here at Facial Hair Friday, I thought it might be time to do a search for “Santa” in ARC. After all, that jolly old elf has a very famous and lush beard.

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa!

Well, Santa Cruz in California. A place where it is warm and sunny and this extremely hip cat from 1972 is enjoying on an amusement park ride with his family. And he is sporting an Afro, mutton chops, goatee, and an attitude of awesome, proving that it was possible to be cool in the 70s.

Great facial hair grown after the 1860s! It warms the cockles of my chilly heart.… [ Read all ]

Facial Hair Friday: In honor of MLK

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at center.
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., at center. (542015 / 306-SSM-4C(51)15)

This Saturday marks the anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington and Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I have a dream” speech.

I was looking through ARC at the pictures of how many people participated, when I noticed something that had never registered before: Martin Luther King Jr. has a mustache.

But when you look at the picture above, you realize why I didn’t notice earlier. He is completely calm and collected, even as he is about to speak to thousands and thousands of people (see image below).  He is focused, in the moment, intense. He is making history. How could anyone watching in person or on film notice minor details then?

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. A wide-angle view of marchers along the mall, showing the Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument, 08/28/1963. ARC 542045.

Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. A wide-angle view of marchers along the mall, showing the Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument, 08/28/1963. (ARC 542045; 306-SSM-4D(80)10)

[ Read all ]