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Tag: JFK

Pennsylvania Avenue Hotline

Today’s guest post comes from David Coleman,  associate professor at the University of Virginia and Chair of the Presidential Recordings Program at the Miller Center of Public Affairs.

On April 28, W.W. Norton will publish volumes 7 and 8 in the Miller Center’s Presidential Recordings of Lyndon B. Johnson series. (The original tapes are in the holdings of the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum.) The volumes, which span June through July 4, 1964, were edited by Guian McKee, Kent Germany, and David Carter.

At 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 28, the National Archives will host Dave Coleman, the editors, and Pulitzer Prize–winning author Taylor Branch to discuss these latest books.

Photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson Meeting with Thurgood Marshall, 06/13/1967 (ARC 2803439)

Photograph of President Lyndon B. Johnson Meeting with Thurgood Marshall, 06/13/1967 (ARC 2803439)

“That’s a good bill, and there’s no reason why you ought to keep a majority from beating it. If you can beat it, go on and beat it, but you oughtn’t to hold it up. You ought to give me a fair shake and give me a chance to vote on it.”
—LBJ to House Minority Leader Charles Halleck, 6:24 p.m., June 22, 1964

 

Behind-the-scenes discussions between the White House and Capitol Hill can be an essential piece of the puzzle in understanding how and why legislation was passed, rejected, or changed, or even a government shutdown averted. But they’re typically

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Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

waiting for maureen

"No, no, I said the torch has been passed, not the lantern. And Bobby said people would remember my speech 50 years from now…"

We’re excited to pass the winning torch to our reader  Michael P., whose caption met the high standard of our guest judge, National Archives editrix Maureen MacDonald.  

Congratulations, Michael P! You can use your 30% discount at the Archives eStore to buy something to read by lantern light.

The actual caption on the photo in the Kennedy Library is “Garnett D. Horner, reporter for the Washington Star and the out-going president of the White House Correspondents’ Association, presents two silver lanterns to President John F. Kennedy at the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner, Sheraton-Park Hotel, Washington, D.C. The lanterns are replicas of the lanterns hung in the Old North Church of Boston on April 18 ,1775.” (Kennedy Library, photo by Abbie Rowe, AR6378-M)

Maureen, a Bay State native herself, gave Curtis P’s caption an honorable mention: “Now, Mr. President. I know you’re from Massachusetts, but I’m sure it’s ‘One if by land, two if by sea.’”

What’s the signal for bad weather in Massachusetts—and across the United States? Some of you are buried in snow, but these two ladies are ready for summer! Well, they’re ready for something. . . tell us what in the comments below!

Your caption here!

Your caption here!

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Hemingway, JFK! What else do I have to say?!

Ernest Hemingway Holding His Son, ca. 1927 (ARC 192694)

Ernest Hemingway holding his son John ("Bumby"), 1924 (Kennedy Library. ARC 192694)

Americans love Paris. They even ended the Revolutionary War by writing and signing the Treaty of Paris in that city on September 3, 1783.

War brought other Americans to Paris. Almost 150 years later, it was home to Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway.

Hemingway’s experience in Paris was colored by war. He arrived in Paris during World War I and went to the Italian front, where he worked briefly as an ambulance driver until injured by mortar fire. He returned to Paris as a correspondent for the Toronto Star in the 1920s, and it was during this time he wrote The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms, novels inspired by those experiences.

He returned again to Europe during World War II, and was present at the D-day landings at Omaha Beach (although as a noncombatant, he did not go ashore.) He won the Nobel Prize for Literature for the Old Man and Sea in 1954, but ended his own life in 1961.

But before that, he loved Paris too. The proof is in his dashing moustache and his stylish beret, evidenced in this picture.

In the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, MA, there are thousands of pictures in the Hemingway Archives, which is part of the collection of the National Archives. Hemingway … [ Read all ]