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Tag: Kennedy Library

American Archives Month: Stacey Chandler, Kennedy Presidential Library

It’s been a great two weeks, but American Archives Month is coming to an end. We’re saying good-bye to the series with a stop at the hometown of the 2013 World Series Champions: Boston, MA.

Full name: Stacey Chandler

Occupation: Archives Technician for Textual Reference at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

How long have you worked at this library?

Five years total, including two years as an intern.

How/why did you decide to go into the archival field?

I interned in the archives at the Kennedy Library through graduate school, while trying to decide exactly what do to with my Public History degree. After two years working with the collections here, how could I choose to work in any other field?

What are some of your responsibilities at your library?

Mainly, I help researchers find and access documents on whatever they’re curious about in the life and times of John F. Kennedy. I also do tours and reference for the Ernest Hemingway collection, and keep on the lookout for preservation concerns, new books to add to the library, and chances to put cool documents in the spotlight.

What do you like best about your job?

The best part of my job is talking with all different kinds of people about history every day. The amazingly wide range of subjects people ask us about keeps … [ Read all ]

Thursday Caption Contest

Because this contest’s photograph came from John F. Kennedy Library, we asked their curator, Stacey Bredhoff, to be our guest judge. So Joyce, say “thank you” to Stacey for picking your caption as the winner. We can’t arrange a meeting with Johnny Depp, but we can send you a 15% discount to the National Archives eStore.

The original caption for this photo with the sci-fi feel is “A radiological technician at the United States Air Force (USAF) School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base (AFB), Texas, demonstrating the master slave remote handling device used to handle radioactive substances used in the Bionucleonics Laboratory.”

Our photo caption candidate this week is of a decidedly less high-tech occurrence (but much sunnier). What is going on here? Put your best caption in the comments section below, and you can win bragging rights for the week as well as a 15% discount to use on anything you choose in the National Archives eStore.… [ Read all ]

Explore the new Digital Archives at the Kennedy Library

It’s always exciting to uncover a new piece of history, and even more exciting to discover a whole new treasure trove of thousands of pieces of history. Today the John F. Kennedy Library is launching a new Digital Archives that contains over 200,000 digitized documents; 300 reels of audiotape containing over 1,200 individual recordings of telephone conversations, speeches, and meetings; 300 museum artifacts; 72 reels of moving images; and 1,500 photos.

You can peruse the drafts of every speech delivered by the President, thousands of official White House photographs, audio of all of President Kennedy’s speeches, and video of press conferences during his years in office. And tags and categories help you find related records among all types of media.

For example, I browsed photographs of President Kennedy to find an illustration for this post, and the above picture caught my eye. After calling up the full record, I selected “Related Records” and was led to links to audio and video recordings of the September 12, 1962, speech at Rice University and to marked drafts and the reading copy of the speech.

Further clicks on the subject categories takes you to even more—you can read the memos between President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson about the space race with the Soviet Union, listen to JFK’s secretly taped conversations with the head of NASA, and … [ Read all ]

Hemingway, JFK! What else do I have to say?!

Americans love Paris. They even ended the Revolutionary War by writing and signing the Treaty of Paris in that city on September 3, 1783.

War brought other Americans to Paris. Almost 150 years later, it was home to Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, and Ernest Hemingway.

Hemingway’s experience in Paris was colored by war. He arrived in Paris during World War I and went to the Italian front, where he worked briefly as an ambulance driver until injured by mortar fire. He returned to Paris as a correspondent for the Toronto Star in the 1920s, and it was during this time he wrote The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms, novels inspired by those experiences.

He returned again to Europe during World War II, and was present at the D-day landings at Omaha Beach (although as a noncombatant, he did not go ashore.) He won the Nobel Prize for Literature for the Old Man and Sea in 1954, but ended his own life in 1961.

But before that, he loved Paris too. The proof is in his dashing moustache and his stylish beret, evidenced in this picture.

In the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, MA, there are thousands of pictures in the Hemingway Archives, which is part of the collection of the National Archives. Hemingway had been invited to Kennedy’s inauguration as part of a group of … [ Read all ]