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Tag: Photo Caption Contest

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

No, see right here, the lights should stay on even if one bulb goes out. They can also play Jingle Bells.

Jan Wilson, it’s been a long wait, but you can now claim the honor of being our last captioner of 2010 and our first declared winner of 2011. President Truman was a practical (and frugal) guy, so why wouldn’t he be able to step up and give tips on Christmas tree gadgetry?

As far as we know, though, on the occasion on which this picture was taken, the lights on the National Christmas Tree went on just as planned. This picture from from the Harry Truman Library is dated December 24, 1945—it’s interesting that the lighting took place so late in the season.

For this new contest, we turn to another President. Inspired by the 50th anniversary of JFK’s inauguration this month, we resume the Thursday photo caption contest with a picture from the John F. Kennedy Library.

jfk-lanterns

Insert your caption!

So now that we all have had time to recover from the holidays, get those brain cells working and give us your best so we can give you 30% off at the National Archives eStore. Start captioning right now in the comments section.… [ Read all ]

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

The cluck stops here

The cluck stops here

Lynn Ansfield, with her short, historically on-the-nose caption took the top honors in the last photo caption contest. Congrats, Lynn, you’ve won 30% off at the National Archives eStore just in time for the holidays!

The Truman Library contains this photo of President Truman receiving a Thanksgiving turkey from members of the Poultry and Egg National Board and other representatives of the turkey industry, outside the White House., 11/16/1949, and many more!

It’s the first week of December, and some parts of the country have already had significant snowfall.  Here’s a photo to get you in the mood for wintry fun. Give us your best, and we’ll give you 30% off your next purchase at the Archives eStore! 

Insert caption here!

Insert caption here!

[ Read all ]

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

The PE rope climb for PS 31 was like no other in New York City.

The PE rope climb for PS 31 was like no other in New York City.

Rebecca, it may be time to quit your day job. You have wowed another one of our guest judges, Kathleen Williams, Executive Director of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

The actual caption for this fund-raising fanatic? “The ‘Human Squirrel’ who did many daring ‘stunts’ in climbing for benefit of War Relief Funds in New York City. He is shown here at a dizzy height in Times Square.” The photo was taken circa 1918, back when superheroes sported suits, not spandex.

Have you got what it takes to craft a caption that catches our eye, and tickles our funny bone? If you do, you could win 30% off at the Archives eStore.

Have a gander at this week’s photo and give us your best!

416242_a

Insert your caption here!

Here’s one to get you started:

Hoarse.

[ Read all ]

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

yourlandourlandsmall

Thinking it was only a myth, the kids were surprised to find the world did actually end at the edge of town.

Ladies and Gentlemen, you have astounded your judge with your caption compositions. Words and phrases like “historical sub-context” and “ingenuity” were used. Also used was the word “shibboleth,” which I had to look up. For the uninitiated, it refers to “any distinguishing practice that is indicative of one’s social or regional origin,” and it was used in reference to Wendy Gish’s winning caption. Not only has she won the approving nod from our esteemed guest judge, but like all our winners, also won 30% off at the National Archives e-Store.

As to the actual caption related to this photo, no, the kids photographed did not arrive at the end of the world, but instead, they arrived upon a small stream. “In 1938, rare flooding in southern California severed a road, trapped an automobile and drew a crowd” according to the book Your Land, Our Land, which highlights the holdings of our regional archives.

This week we dug deep into the Archives to find another photo stripped of context just waiting for a caption to captivate our next guest judge. But who is our mysterious judge? Will he be able to use shibboleth in a sentence? In fact, he will. To find … [ Read all ]

Thursday’s Photo Caption Contest

"Gerald's ideas about postmodern camouflage systems were not well received."

"Gerald's ideas about postmodern camouflage systems were not well received."

Zebras, Fruit Stripes gum mascot, firing squads, post modernism . . . what a compendium of cunning captioning! Mr. Tom Mills was up all night last night poring over each comment with a keen eye toward hilarity and utter genius and has selected last week’s winner. In the end Keith Ramsey was dubbed the Captionista who captured our judge’s flare for funny.

But what was that postmodern fashion icon doing in front of that wall?  Great question. The original caption for this 1917 photo reads: “Soldier in black and white uniform to conceal him while climbing trees. He stands in front of a house camouflaged to represent a fence and trees. Company F, 24th Engineers. American University, D.C. Army Engineer Corps.”

While this week’s photo doesn’t involve the niche fence-camouflage market, it does have something in common with last week’s image: it makes no sense. Our guest judge this week is the esteemed, indefatigable chief of the Archives II Textual Records Reference Staff, Tim Nenninger. Victory in the ring will get you 30% off at the National Archives e-Store and a week’s supply of bragging rights.

So readers, lend us thy captions!

Insert your caption!

Insert your caption!

Here’s something to get you started:

“Mr. Poppins was called in after the spoonful of sugar proved ineffective.”

[ Read all ]