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Tag: President Ford

American Archives Month: Stacy Davis, Ford Presidential Library

We’re coming to the end of American Archives Month. This time, we’re heading back to the Midwest, up to Ann Harbor and Grand Rapids, MI. This Presidential Library belongs to a famous University of Michigan grad: Gerald Ford.

Stacy Davis - Ford Library

Stacy Davis is an archivist at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library.

Name: Stacy Davis

Occupation: Archivist at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library

How long have you worked at this library? 

Ten years, but I have worked 15 years for the National Archives.

How/why did you decide to go into the archival field?

I found the archives field by accident. While I was finishing my undergraduate degree in History at Central Michigan University, I found out about an internship at the John F. Kennedy Library through a flyer. I got the job, and from that point I was hooked on archives!

What are some of your responsibilities at your library?

I participate in a wide variety of activities at the Ford Library. I am the manager of the Library’s digitization program, the ARC point of contact, Specially Protected Materials control person, student employee supervisor. I help monitor the research room, accession new materials, sometimes process new collections, and provide reference assistance.

What do you like best about your job?

I think what I like best is the variety of things that I get to do, and the people I get … [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

Yosef Croce used visual aids when he played his mournful rendition of “Time In a Bottle.”

What can you say about a man, his accordion, a clock, and a bottle? We went to guest judge and social media coordinator Jeannie Chen, who once featured a infant President Ford holding a tiny accordion on the Presidential Libraries tumblr blog.

Congratulations to Mickey! Your caption won Jeannie’s heart and got that Croce tune stuck in her head. Check your email for a code for 15% off in our eStore.

The man in the photograph has been featured before on Pieces of History in this Facial Hair Friday post. William Duncan was the  founder of  Metlakahtla, a Utopian community in Alaska. The original caption reads: “William Duncan late in life, exhibiting to friends for photographing the canvas, hammock, clock, water bottle, and accordian [sic] used by him on his voyage to Victoria, B.C., in 1856-57., 1916 – 1917″ (ARC 297897)

Last week featured an accordion, and this week we are featuring another strange device. Give us your wittest caption in the comments below!

Your caption here!

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Thursday Photo Caption Contest

"Now everybody sing 'YMCA.'"

Last week’s photo of men swinging from the trees inspired many noteworthy captions, from the Pirates of Penzance to pigeon interception. Overwhelmed by choice, we turned to our guest judge James Kratsas of the Gerald R. Ford Museum in Michigan.

James was also overwhelmed—by grim memories of dancing at weddings, and he chose Marene B’s caption. Congratulations, and check your e-mail for a code to get 15% off your purchase in our eStore!

Like President Ford, the men in last week’s picture are graduates of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The caption reads “Vocational training for S.A.T.C. in University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Class in Pole-Climbing in the course for telephone electricians, with some of their instructors. University of Michigan, ca. 1918″ (ARC  533483; 165-WW-119A[1]).”

In this week’s caption, everyone’s feet are firmly on the ground—for now. (This image is also from our new exhibit, “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?” which opens tomorrow with our Chief Culinary Adviser Chef Jose Andres!)

Put your tastiest caption in the comments below!

Your caption here!

[ Read all ]

Green Bay Packer, Detroit Lion, or US President?

“]Gerald Ford, Jr. out on the football field at the University of Michigan, 1933 [GRF-WHPO-H0035(03)]

Gerald Ford, Jr. out on the football field at the University of Michigan, 1933 [GRF-WHPO-H0035(03)

These days, the average NFL player receives about $1.2 million a year, not a bad paycheck for throwing around the old pigskin. After all, that’s three times what the President makes (though he does get free limo rides), and plenty more than your average blogger does (sigh).

But in 1935, playing football wasn’t the glitzy well-funded enterprise it is today. That’s the year the Green Bay Packers went looking for a center, and found future President Gerald Ford. They offered President Ford $110 bucks a game.  Over the course of a season—14 games—that means Ford would’ve squirreled away $1,540, about $24,000 bucks in 2011 dollars, if he had accepted the draft deal.

Ford declined this offer, and another offer from the Detroit Lions to play professional football, and instead made his way over into Yale to study law, then to the Navy to serve his country, then to the House of Representatives, and finally to the White House where, thankfully, the salary was a bit better.

You can learn more at the Gerald Ford Presidential Library’s Facebook page.

Letter from the Green Bay Packers to Gerald Ford (Gerald Ford Presidential Library)

Letter from the Green Bay Packers to Gerald Ford (Gerald Ford Presidential Library)

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