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What’s Cooking Wednesday: Top Ten Food Records of 2011

As 2011 draws to a close, so does our exhibit “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?” which will end on January 3, 2012.

It’s been a great year for food here at the National Archives. We’ve had amazing guests come and speak, including Chef José Andrés, our neighbor and Chief Culinary Adviser for the exhibit; Chef Roland Mesnier, former White House pastry chef; Diana Kennedy, guru of Mexican food; Ann Harvey Yonkers, co-director of FRESHFARM markets; Jessica B. Harris, author of High on the Hog; and George Motz, author of Hamburger America.

And of course, we’ve been writing about food-related records in the National Archives almost every Wednesday since the exhibit opened. We thought it would be fun to look back at the Top Ten Food Records in honor of this exhibit. Since we couldn’t include all of the records, we chose the ones that were most striking, strange, or popular.

Here’s our Top Ten list of memorable food records!

TEN: My coworker was constantly amused by this label for “Grains of Health,” which is profuse in its praise but vague in its description of these grains might actually be. Her favorite line: “It is so prepared that the strongest and the most delicate person may drink it at the same table.”

Grains of Health Label (ARC 5714039), Records of the Patent and Trademark Office

 

NINE: “Pig Cafeteria” is a … [ Read all ]

Romance in the Records

I was worried I would never find love at the National Archives.

When Scribd.com approached my office about promoting Prologue magazine by creating a collection of romantic records for their Valentine’s Day “Eat Say Love” event, I was very doubtful. Would I be able to find enough romance in the records to put together a collection?

The answer, of course, is yes! (The answer is also to ask your colleagues for help!)  The National Archives holds the records of a nation, and that includes our love stories. From lovestruck teenagers to future First Ladies on honeymoon to Depression-era valentines, Americans have left the evidence of their feelings in the records.

You can see all our romantic documents in our collection “Romance through History,” but I’ve highlighted three images below that tugged or tickled my heartstrings.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

This is romantic image in a very sad way—this young man is saying goodbye to his sweetheart as his regiment leaves for Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, SC, during World War I.  She's dressed so beautifully and is clearly trying to be brave, and he seems calm and confident. So many young men died in World War I—whenever I look at this picture, I hope these sweethearts were reunited safely at the end of the war. (Source: Record Group 165: Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, ARC Identifier 533733 / 165-WW-476(21)

This is a romantic image in a very sad way—this young man is saying goodbye to his sweetheart as his regiment leaves for Camp Wadsworth, Spartanburg, SC, during World War I. I hope they were reunited after the war. (Record Group 165: Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs)

This is a wartime picture too, but it makes me smile--even during wartime, people fell in love, got married, and had babies! Edward Spillane, Jr., was the first baby born at Camp Kilmer, NJ, on March 2, 1945. His mother Dorothy Inman Spillane was a former WAC (Women's Army Corps). The baby's father was S.Sgt. Edward Francis Spillane, but he was in France with the U.S. Army Air Forces at the time of his son's birth, so this photograph completed the family portrait. (Source: Record Group 336, Records of the Office of the Chief of Transportation, National Archives at New York)

This is a wartime picture too, but it makes me smile—even during wartime, people fell in love, got married, and had babies! Edward Spillane, Jr., was the first baby born at Camp Kilmer, NJ, on March

[ Read all ]