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Tag: Truman Library

Say cheese, Mr. President: White House photographers at the Truman Library

White House Photographer Cecil Stoughton took this iconic photo of Lyndon B. Johnson's swearing in ceremony after John. F. Kennedy was assassinated. (ARC 194235)

Only 43 men in the history of the United States have held the title of President.

That’s a fairly small group , smaller than your average NFL team. But smaller still is the group of professionals who have held the title as the President’s chief photographer. To date, only nine men have served as the official White House Photographer.

Cecil Stoughton, hired by John. F. Kennedy to be the official president's photographer, also captured private moments of the president's life. Here, JFK and his daughter Caroline share a quiet moment aboard the Honey Fitz during a weekend in Hyannisport, MA. (ARC 194267)

President John F. Kennedy first appointed photographer Cecil Stoughton in 1960 in the role of White House Photographer. In the nearly 50 years following that first appointment, Presidential photographers have served as visual historians of the President’s daily life.

These photographers captured rare glimpses inside the White House and the historic moments of the Presidents they served. In addition to iconic images that enter the public’s memory of the President, private moments are captured as well.

On October 21, 2011, the Truman Library and Museum in Independence, MO, is excited to share the works of these photographers with  the exhibition “The President’s Photographer: … [ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

"Yes, the buck stops here, but dolls and puppets keep going two doors down the hall and to the left."

Since this week’s photo featured President Harry S. Truman, we turned to Tammy Kelly, an archivist at the Truman Library, to pick our winner for the photo contest. She has firsthand knowledge of this photo since she is the one who cataloged the doll into the Truman Library’s computerized system earlier this summer.

Tammy picked John W.’s quote as one that tickled her funny bone. Congratulations, John W.! Check your e-mail for a code for 15% off in the eStore.

The original caption for the photo is “Photograph of President Truman in the Oval Office, receiving a doll from Dr. Helen Kim, a Korean educator, as Dr. John Myun Chang, Ambassador of the Republic of Korea to the United States, and Dr. Frederick Brown Harris, Chaplain of the Senate, look on. 05/08/1951″ (ARC 200314; Harry S. Truman Library). Tammy added that while they do not have much information about the doll itself, she could tell us that the doll is wearing a dark red skirt, and the dress features brightly striped sleeves.

Dolls, puppets, and office politics aside, this week’s photo takes us back to nature. Put your best captions in the comment box below!

[ Read all ]

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

"Donkey: `I don’t even care if I am the official Democratic Party mascot – seriously, I LIKE IKE!'”

Congratulations to Andrew P, who won the approval of our guest judge Samuel Rushay, senior archivist at the Truman Presidential Library. Your caption gave us much-needed insight into the hearts of political mascots whose vote lies with other party. Check your email for a code to use for 15% in the eStore!

Sam recently appeared in our newest “Inside the Vaults” videos to talk about some unusual sketches that survived a trip through the jungle and eventually were accessioned by the Truman Library.

This photo doesn’t have any mysterious drawings, but our sharp-eyed readers did catch the writing in the corner that tells a little bit of the story of this record from 1952. The description reads: “Photo of Mrs. Nelles Olson Becker of St. Paul, Minnesota, with a donkey, entitled ‘Not for Republican Ears.’ Signed: ‘To President Truman- Best Always- Nelles Olson Becker.’ This photo was published in the St. Paul Sunday Pioneer Press.”

In today’s photo, we’ve got another special animal and human moment. Give us your funniest caption in the comments below!

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Hats off to Bess Truman!

Bess Truman's hat, 1906. (Truman Library)

Bess in a feathered hat, 1906. (Truman Library)

Here at Prologue: Pieces of History, we have Facial Hair Friday. On the Harry S. Truman Library’s Facebook page, they celebrate Millinery Monday! When I was very little, I loved poking through my mother’s old hatboxes stored in the basement. Alas, the era of wearing hats for every occasion had passed, but she had saved her favorites.

Bess Truman apparently did the same thing. The Truman Library has several of her hats and many more photographs of her in hats at various stages of her life. Scrolling through the Truman Library’s page is a good substitute for exploring my mother’s hatboxes. Not only do you get to see some remarkable chapeaux, but you also get to see the very stylish young Bess Wallace (and others) wearing the hats.

 Bess (left) with her best friend, Mary Paxton, ca. 1901. (Truman Library)

Bess Wallace (left) with her best friend, Mary Paxton, ca. 1901. (Truman Library)

Because Millinery Monday covers the span of Bess Truman’s life, we get to see how hat styles changed from the start of the 20th century through its late decades. We also get to see a part of the library’s collection that is not usually seen by the public. On the National Archives Facebook page, click through our list of “Favorite Pages” to find out more about the Presidential libraries, regional archives, and other units that are all … [ Read all ]