Site search

Site menu:

Find Out More

Archives

Categories

Contact Us

Subscribe to Email Updates

Tag: WWI

What’s Cooking Wednesdays: Canning for Victory!

Records of the U.S. Food Administration, World War I-era poster designed by Burton Magee of Monroe, Iowa, Record Group 4.

Today’s “What’s Cooking Wednesdays” guest post comes from Kimberlee Ried, public programs specialist at the National Archives in Kansas City.

Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses, yearning to breath free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore,
Send these, the homeless, tempest tossed,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.

These words, written by Emma Lazarus, are inscribed on the tablet held by the Statue of Liberty, given as a gift to the United States from France in 1886.  This iconic statue has symbolized patriotism and freedom often associated with the United States. 

 This “Be a Victory Canner” poster, found in the records of the National Archives at Kansas City, was created by a child during World War I. The drawing evokes similar patriotic undertones with the depiction of Lady Liberty as a Victory Canner. 

The poster is found in the Records of the U.S. Food Administration, a short-lived federal agency created in 1917 as a part of the Food and Fuel Control Act.  During World War I this agency was responsible for regulating the supply, distribution, and conservation of products for the Allies.  Such items needed for conservation were fuel, wool, sugar, and wheat. 

This “Be a Victory Canner” poster is one … [ Read all ]

Potatriots: The original Freedom Fries

Potatoes in Iowa become "the newest fighting corps" on the domestic front, ca. 1917 - ca. 1918. (National Archives at Kansas City, ARC 283501).

These Iowa spuds were decades ahead of the “Freedom Fries” idea! To help the war effort during First World War, U.S. citizens were encouraged to eat more potatoes while wheat was being sent to the soldiers overseas.

This World War I store window display showed potatoes dressed as soldiers, encouraging both children and adults to remember the fighting men overseas. (In fact, a column in a 1918 issue of Cosmopolitan magazine encouraged citizens to conserve food and “Stop Eating Soldiers!”)

The National Archives Experience is sponsoring an activity from July 11 to July 31 in conjunction with our new exhibition, “What’s Cooking, Uncle Sam?” Inspired by this World War I display, we invite you to create your own “potatriot” diorama! You can draw inspiration from any historical event of your choosing—feel free to be as creative as possible!

Send a photo of your potato diorama to volunteer@nara.gov, and we will post it in an album on the National Archives Facebook page.

All submissions will be entered into a drawing. At the end of the month, a winner will be randomly selected to receive a prize from the Foundation for the National Archives!

(And if you are visiting us in … [ Read all ]